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SMLC seminar: Nineteenth-Century Canton Trade and its Relevance to Hong Kong Studies
 
 
Date: 21 September 2016 
 
School of Modern Languages and Cultures HKU has the pleasure of inviting you to the SMLC seminar:

Nineteenth-Century Canton Trade and its Relevance to Hong Kong Studies

Dr. John Wong

Date: 21 Sep, 2016(Wed)
Time: 4:30pm-6:00pm
Venue: CRT-4.36, Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus, HKU

Abstract
John Wong’s recent publication explores the economic dynamism of global commerce at the Chinese city of Canton (present day Guangzhou) until the advent of the Treaty Port era in 1842.  As the Qing court promulgated the decree that confined Sino-Western trade to Canton in 1757, western merchants congregated at that southern Chinese port to transact with licensed Chinese traders, known as Hong merchants.  For twenty-first-century Hongkongers, what lessons could we draw from the success of these Chinese merchants in charting their course of global trade before the Opium War and the subsequent disintegration of their Canton-based trading networks?
 
Biography
John Wong’s research interests focus on transnational business history. He holds a Ph.D. in History from Harvard University, as well as a B.A. in Economics from the University of Chicago and an M.B.A. from Stanford University. He worked for a number of years in investment banking and investment management and holds the designation of Chartered Financial Analyst.  His book, Global Trade in the Nineteenth Century: The House of Houqua and the Canton System.  (Cambridge, U.K.:  Cambridge University Press, 2016), examines the China Trade in the context of early-nineteenth-century global exchange.


 
 
     
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