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Talk: Creative Translation
 
 
Venue: Theatre 6, Meng Wah Complex
 
Date: 7 November 2006 
 
Time: 9:00 - 11:30
 

The School of Modern Languages and Cultures is pleased to announce a talk by Professor Jin Di on Creative Translation

Date: 7 November 2006 (Tuesday)
Time: 9:45 am to 11:30 am
Language: English
 
About the speaker : 
Professor Jin Di's translation of James Joyce's Ulysses has been called 'the translation of the century'.  Professor Jin has also translated a volume of Shen Congwen's stories into English. The translation  of  Ulysses won the Best Book Prize, National Rainbow Award for Superior Literary Translation, and the First Class National Prize for  Foreign Literary Work. Last year, he received Honorary Membership of the Irish Translators' and Interpreters' Association.
 
Besides doing translation, Professor Jin writes and  lectures on translation theory.  Among his works in this area are the prize - winning  'On Translation' (with Eugene Nida, recently republished in a revised edition) and  'Literary  Translation: The Quest for Artistic Integrity'.   Professor Jin has also published 'Shamrock and Chopsticks' and a book of essays in Chinese.
 
After retiring from his professorship in China, Professor Jin has continued his research and writing as a visiting  fellow at Oxford University,  Yale, Notre Dame, the University of Virginia, the National Humanities Center, the University of Washington and the University of Oregon.
 
Abstract : 
'What is creative translation?' may sound like an inane question.  Isn't the translator's right to create his or  her translation?  But in fact one may easily become destructive to the work of art being translated either by  creating things that hurt its spirit and imagery, or by failing to innovate where innovation is necessary.  This  subtle issue will be discussed in four sections:
 
I. Creative but Dubious
II. Semantic Innovation
III. Total Transformation
IV. Conclusion
 
Some of the discussions will be based on 'The Great Sage in Literary Translation' (On Translation.  Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong Press 2006) and Literary Translation, Quest for Artistic Integrity (Birmingham: St. Jerome Publishing, 2003).

 
 
     
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